Saturday, December 12, 2015

Hanukkah- Oil The Good Things

First the students enjoyed the story of the oil miraculously lasting for eight days.
Then they used 'real' clay to make their own small [oil] pitcher. 

Hopefully yours made it home. They were VERY delicate. It is truly miraculous that even one survived in the Beit Hamikdash.

Then we explored oil.
The students compared three very different types of oil, using their five sense.

The students like olive oil, but were most impressed by the "sesame noodle one".

Then we did a science experiment with the oils.

The students examined a vessel of water. The students discussed many of the properties of water, where it is found, and the many ways water is needed. Everyone enjoyed naming another living creature that needs water. "And for swimming lessons!" Michal added. "We NEED water for swimming lessons."

We looked at oil and discussed its properties. Everyone said it was important for cooking. "But I don't want the sesame noodle one in a cookie. That wouldn't taste right," Chaya pointed out. 

Each student got a cup with a small amount of oil. They selected a food coloring bottle and added 3 drops to their oil. 

The students gently stirred the color and oil.
Then it was time for the magic.
Using a pipette, the students dropped their solutions into the water. 


The colors slowly disperse, in a very beautiful way. 

We used the remaining oil and food dye to make art. They dripped the color onto sevivon shaped papers.

The squeezing is great for artistic fun, fine motor coordination, and muscular development in pincher fingers. 

We ended the day by eating oily bumuelos. Only the real Sephardi kids liked them. Many kids wouldn't try them and those who did threw them in the garbage after a bite. :(. 
I can teach many topics, but not taste. :)

Tuesday, December 1, 2015

Black Ice Fun

All grown ups are terrified by the prospect of driving on black ice.
But children love playing on it!
When I first realized there was ice on the playground, I worried about safety. But instead of forbidding the area, the children were cautioned so they had the opportunity to experience and learn.
First they were hesitant.

Then they loved it.
Then they fell.
No one cried from their fall because they were informed and prepared for the danger.